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Customer Service is Improved by Matchmaking

“Your call may be recorded for training and quality purposes.”

We’ve all heard this before. Companies use call center recordings for training and compliance purposes. But imagine a solution that uses technology, data and analytics in real-time to automatically match customers to like-minded customer service representatives. Software that uses algorithms to analyze customer speech for tone, tempo, and syntax to identify the customer’s personality type and behavioral preferences.

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What Led to Amazon Being a Household Name

These days, Amazon is practically a household name. Of course, they haven’t always been at the top of the game. In fact, it took a lot of hard work and customer care to get to where they are now. Among companies today, Amazon is arguably the leader in continuously raising the bar. In 2013, the company released its Mayday button for the Kindle Fire HDX tablet. The single-click support solution allows tablet owners to access an Amazon customer service representative via webcam. Within fifteen seconds, an Amazon representative shows up on-screen to solve problems in a responsive fashion with a simple touch of a button.

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The Case for Little Data Not Big Data – Providing Proactive Real-Time Response for Customer Issues

How many times have you heard “big data” in the last year? Likely a few dozen and that estimate may be on the low side. We have more data today than ever before. Analysts and technologists are often excited about the expanse of data and all of the possible big data problems they can solve.

I’m a big fan of big data. But I’m a bigger fan of little data. Most customer experience problems only require little data to solve. Let’s look at some examples:

  • Proactively rebooking a customer when his or her flight is cancelled
  • Notifying a customer if an order will ship later than expected
  • Understanding who your top customers are and rewarding them

In fact, if you spend too much time trying to wow your customers with what you can do with big data, you may miss out on many of the little data opportunities. And if you don’t get the basics right, your customers will see your attempts at wowing them as a sign your company isn’t aligned with their needs.

Last week, I was pleasantly surprised by UPS. I had a package en route and I needed it sooner than expected on the delivery day. I used an option in UPS My Choice to confirm a two-hour delivery window for a fee of $8.00. Imagine how I felt when the package was delivered twenty minutes late? I wasn’t angry because I know delivery mishaps are normal. What I dreaded, however, was the process of filing a claim to get my $8.00 back. The idea of spending the time to get $8.00 back felt like a waste, but I knew I had to do it. I have principles, after all.

Screen Shot 2016-09-16 at 10.05.05 PMAnd then it happened. One simple email. Three simple sentences:

“We were unable to deliver the package(s) shown below during the confirmed delivery window you requested. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. You have not been charged for this request.”

Bam. There it was. Proactive, real-time action within 40 minutes of my package delivery. And them my mood changed. I was no longer irritated. I was relieved I didn’t have to take any action to ensure I wasn’t charged the $8.00 fee.

One of the 12 types of Purple Goldfish is “Handling Mistakes.” While we all try to avoid mistakes, how you handle them matters to customers. And doing so proactively and automatically? That’s a fine Blue Goldfish.

Want to learn more about using little data?
A great first step is downloading a sample chapter from Blue Goldfish. Based on over 300 examples, Blue Goldfish explains how successful companies use technology, data, and analytics to drive customer loyalty and advocacy.

Sign up for a PurpleGoldfish.com account today and receive a Free Sample Chapter of Blue Goldfish.

Four of Five Customers Demand Improved Response Times from Companies

kindle-fire-hdx-7In our on-demand world, customers expect companies to respond to their needs. According to research by IBM, four out of five customers demand improved response time from businesses they frequent. Consumers no longer judge you in comparison to the competition, they are holding you up to the bar set during their latest experience.

Mayday, Mayday

Among companies today, Amazon is arguably the leader in continuously raising the bar. In 2013, the company released its Mayday button for the Kindle Fire HDX tablet. The single-click support solution allows tablet owners to access an Amazon customer service representative via webcam. Within fifteen seconds, an Amazon representative shows up on-screen to solve problems in a responsive fashion with a simple touch of a button.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos says it’s, “actually very similar to having someone standing next to you.” In addition to the live video, Mayday call reps can draw lines and shapes on the user’s screen in order to provide visual instruction, telling the user which buttons to press or which menu to open. They can even control the tablet directly if the owner has enabled the feature.

According to TechCrunch, Amazon “built a full infrastructure to support it at their HQ in Seattle and, on board, the hardware. By compressing the video signals, they are able to send more data to the devices from tech support and allow tech support to see the data remotely.”

Providing tech support isn’t an easy proposition for both the company and the customer. The Mayday system helps both parties. Customers get better customer service while Amazon reduces the costly number of unnecessary phone calls. It’s convenient too. Mayday is online 24 hours a day, every day of the year, with a live representative available at any time.

The feature has been a huge hit with consumers. Among tablet owners, 75 percent of customer service interactions now come via the button. Amazon has now extended the service to its Fire phone.

Why did this work so well? It’s because Amazon is responding to its customers at the exact time of need. It’s leveraging technology to cure little problems before they become big thorny ones. The average time it takes for the representative to pop up on the screen is under ten seconds.

A couple of FAQ’s on Amazon’s website tell the story of how Amazon is focusing on leveraging technology as a Blue Goldfish to set themselves apart from the competition:

Is this your attempt to compensate for not having a genius bar? No. This is a completely new approach to tech support: you get your own personal tech advisor from the comfort of your home or office.

This seems like a weird thing to invest so much time and money into? We strive to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, and this is just one more way we are working to achieve that goal.

Earth’s most customer-centric company has set the bar on responsiveness. As with all expectations, you can’t meet them. You can either exceed them or fall short.

The choice is yours.

Ready to Move Your Business Forward?
A great first step is downloading a sample chapter from Blue Goldfish. Based on over 300 examples, Blue Goldfish explains how successful companies use technology, data, and analytics to drive customer loyalty and advocacy. Sign up for a PurpleGoldfish.com account today and receive a Free Sample Chapter of Blue Goldfish.

Editor’s Note: This post is an excerpt from Blue Goldfish: Using Technology, Data, and Analytics to Drive Both Profits and Prophets.